Contests

Home to the World's Largest Whitetail Deer Contest

Each year, thousands of the biggest bucks from around the state of Texas are individually scored at Los Cazadores in Pearsall and Stonewall TX. 

Contest entries are only eligible and valid if the deer is scored at one of our official Los Cazadores check-in locations at either our Pearsall or Stonewall stores.

2021/2022 Season Contests

Deer

In 1986 an annual “Big Deer Contest” competition for hunters who hunt South Texas and Northern Mexico was started. The competition was named “Los Cazadores”, which in Spanish means “The Hunters”.

The contest continues today, making this year the 35th annual competition, now utilizing TrophyScan technology for scoring deer and featuring new divisions including Hill Country, Exotic, West Texas and Disabled Outdoorsmen.

Predator

Predator hunting in Texas is known for its pace and sportsmanship, making it a memorable marathon of endurance and luck. Gather your best team and join the hunt!

Whitetail Shed

A treasure hunt, Los Cazadores style!

With High Fence, Low Fence and Open divisions, this contest celebrates antlers after they’ve fallen.

Turkey

High fence, low fence, archery and youth compete in this fun springtime competition. Subcategories include longest beard, heaviest bird, longest spurs and best overall. 

Trophy Scan

a patented system for scoring and replicating trophy game animals, and it’s now exclusively at Los Cazadores.

Trophyscan Image
Trophyscan Image

The Trophy Scan scoring method utilizes a patented technology called VoluMetrics, which was designed by an international team of hunter-programmers to map millions of data points captured by a unique 3D scan of any trophy game animal. Once the data is captured, VoluMetrics’ algorithms compute virtually any measurement with stunning speed and accuracy. VoluMetrics instantly counts, labels and measures all tine lengths, as well as inside, outside and tip-to-tip spreads before recording myriad mass measurements and other calculations. Because antlers, horns and animal skulls are three-dimensional objects, measuring them in two-dimensional linear units (inches, feet, yards, etc.) is inherently limited. Three-dimensional cubic measurements, however, account for every bit of bone, horn or antler the animal grows without penalizing it for non-uniformity or small tine length. But while the volume of uniform objects is simple to calculate, complex organic shapes such as deer antlers are not.